Andy Wicks Paints Blog

Prophetic Diagrams at George and Jørgen

Posted in Uncategorized by Andy Wicks on 9 January, 2013

Prophetic Diagrams reopens at George and Jorgen after the winter break and has been extended till Saturday 16th February. The large survey exhibition of drawing/ diagrammatic mark making features artist from UK and New York including a number of established artists often showing rare lesser known/ preparatory works. One of my Plane Sight diptychs features alongside works by Sarah Lucas and Dan Perfect, a piece I felt was made for the show when I read the brief. I’ve been following George and Jorgen for since they opened at the end of 2010 and have been introduced to some great artists through their program, personal favourites include – Peter Ainsworth, Martin Newth and Tom Pope who have each had stand out solo shows with the gallery in past 2 years. I highly recommend you take the time to see this diverse and rich exhibition while you have the chance. George and Jorgen sits just off Bermondsey Street (a short walk from London Bridge) and next door to the new White Cube space.

James Pimperton
Feeler, 2012, pencil on paper
27.5 x 19.5 cm

George and Jorgen
9 Morocco Street
London
SE1 3HB

Open Wednesday – Saturday, 11am – 6pm or by appointment 0203 583 8825

Chris Baker, Mike Ballou, Nathaniel Mellors and Chris Bloor, William Corwin, Rose Davey, Julius Doehner, Claire Dorsett ,Clara Fialho, Paddy Gould and Roxy Topia, Noah Landfield, Ronnie Landfield, Sarah Lucas, Paulina Michnowska, Roxy Paine, Simon Patterson, Bruce Pearson, Joyce Pensato, Elise Co and Nik Pashenkov, Dan Perfect, James Pimperton, Nathalie Provosty, Fiona Rae, Nick Roberts, Bob and Roberta Smith, Ellen Stanford, Carin Riley, Gaetan Sigonney, Sandi Slone, Lucy Skaer, Pinky Tesfay, James Trimmer, Jessica Voorsanger, Tom Webb, Andy Wicks, Holly Zausner.

Lucy Skaer
Solid Ground – Rib, 2006, aluminium leaf on Fabriano paper
140 x 200 cm

William Corwin’s essay for the exhibition is inspired by the illustrations in an 18th century book of black magic that he discovered in a dumpster in Greenwich Village in 1993. Assembling a diverse group of established and emerging artists from the UK and New York, he invited them to respond to his essay. The artists then created or chose a piece from their own collection to put in the show.

The exhibition explores the role that drawing plays within an artist’s practice. Corwin explains that “drawing is so often subsumed as a very practical preparatory act of the artist, or, in an effort to be very notpreparatory, it can often be very finished—very inky, or very big—but the theme of this exhibition, prophetic diagrams, is more about the artist’s preparing their thinking, not necessarily for anything in particular, but a necessary ordering of the universe, a summoning of the artistic spirits.”

Click here for William Corwin’s essay and online catalogue for the exhibition

Fiona RaeUntitled (small collage no.3), mixed media on archive paper on board19.2 x 16.1 cm

Fiona Rae
Untitled (small collage no.3), mixed media on archive paper on board
19.2 x 16.1 cm

Website updated with 2012 works

Posted in Paintings, Website / Blog update by Andy Wicks on 13 July, 2012

I’ve updated my website with some new works from the past few months you can see a selection below with more on www.andywicks.co.uk

Hell and High Water I

Hell and High Water IV

Hell and High Water VIII

Plane Sight VIII

Plane Sight IX

Collectible – Zeitgeist Art Projects 18 – 28th April

Posted in Exhibitions by Andy Wicks on 9 April, 2012

I have a couple of new paintings in this exhibition which also features a whole heap of artists doing interesting things right now. My contributions are part of what will now be known as the ‘Hell and High Water’ series, an expanded body of work continuing the format of my 2011’s piece Irene (below). The images of Hell and High Water come from what were initially my photographic outtakes from Thames walk, structures which I discovered at high tide when the water level obscured the majority of its form. When sorting through these images I realized the abstraction caused by the tide changed the previously functional structures into odd legless stumps, seemingly no longer rooted to the bank but floating just proud of the surface.

Irene (Hell and High Water), 2011, Oil on canvas,
25.5 x 20.5 cm

A high-profile inaugural exhibition of 67 promising, mid-career and established International Zeitgeist artists from across all disciplines; including painting, drawing, photography, sculpture and print from £50-£500. These artists in an act of generosity and accessibility have made their works available for affordable prices so that art collectors old and new are able to invest in some of the most promising and established collectible artists whom normally usually sell upwards of £500.

Curated by Rosalind Davis & Annabel Tilley

Zeitgeist Project Space
ASC Bond House
Goodwood Road
New Cross
London
SE14 6BL


Guy Allott, Iain Andrews, Edwina Ashton, Paul Benjamins, George Bolster, Kate Bowen, Andrew Bracey, Tom Butler, Ben Coode-Adams, Emma Cousin, Graham Crowley, Rosalind Davis, David Dipre, Sarah Douglas, Freya Douglas Morris, Annabel Dover, Charlie Dutton, Karl England, Alyson Helyer, Andrew Hewish, Jack Hutchinson, Peter Jones, Nick Kaplony, David Kefford, Sharon Leahy-Clark, Simon Leahy-Clark, Cathy Lomax, Wayne Lucas, Fiona MacDonald, EJ Major, Amy McKenny, Nadege Meriau, Marion Michell, Clare Mitten, Amy Moffat, Kate Murdoch, Elizabeth Murton, Michaela Nettell, Charlotte Norwood, Wieland Payer, Alex Pearl, Edd Pearman, Gaia Persico, Kate Pickering, Chantelle Purcell, Giulia Ricci, Mark Scott-Wood, Alli Sharma, Gordon Shrigley, Lisa Snook, Emily Speed, Corinna Spencer, Melanie Stidolph, Boa Swindler, Freddie Robins, Annabel Tilley, Virginia Verran, Jenny Wiener, Rich White, Andy Wicks, Rachel Wilberforce, Chiara Williams, Sarah Williams, Jonny Williamson, Jo Wilmot, James Wright, Peter Wylie.

Andy Wicks – Interview January 2012

Posted in News, Writings by Andy Wicks on 29 January, 2012

Here’s a recent interview I did for Claudio Parentela’s blog, you can see more interviews here www.elvisinh.blogspot.com

Well, first of all please tell us a little about yourself.

I was born on the southern edge of London, a world of commuters and slightly wider streets. I spend most of my time in east London these days where I have my studio practice and do a bit of technician work.

How would you describe your work?

I’m interested in the city and the role it plays in our lives. I enjoy walking paths and looking for things that others may miss, subtle oddities in the environment that take my imagination. My current body of work has taken River Thames mooring structures (dolphins) as an motif for a forgotten past, one of the remaining elements of the River’s (and the city’s) shipping heritage. Still rooted to the mudbanks but gently rotting away with the movement of the tide. There’s a form of romantic longing and storytelling held within these structures for me. The paintings I’ve make as a result walk a line between the heavy ugly brutality of their construction (rotting and rusting colours) and a simplistic beauty in their form.

Did somebody encourage you to become an artist?

I wouldn’t say one person did as such, but growing up I enjoyed playing with art materials. I would always be painting and drawing on family holidays even from a young age. While at school it became apparent that the only subject I really cared about was the art lesson so I just took each opportunity to study further until I got to the stage that I couldn’t imagine doing anything else.

What is your favorite medium?

I work mainly with oil paint and use resins to create a flat layered surface to work on to. I enjoy the constant discovery of the medium, the way it can be manipulated to perform in numerous ways on the same canvas.

Generally speaking, where do your ideas come from?

The world around me informs my ideas, often from walking somewhere with my camera and having an appreciation for the undervalued.

How long does it take to complete a piece?

With long drying times especially using resin I usually have a few canvases on the go at once. They can take anything from a couple of weeks to few months. I don’t tend to come back to unfinished pieces, if they aren’t working for me I move on to something that has more potential.

Who are your favorite artists…and who are some artists you are currently looking/listening to?

My tastes are split down the middle between ‘clean’ abstraction (Tobias Lehner, Thomas Scheibitz) and a more out their ‘messy’ approach (Albert Oehlen, Anselm Kiefer). I guess I should also say I’m particular into German artist if that wasn’t already apparent… I’m also into the work of Gert & Uwe Tobias who are known for producing large woodcuts but their output also includes sculpture, collage, drawing all tided together through interest exhibition design.

Are you represented by a gallery? Do you have any upcoming exhibits?

I’m not represented but try to be proactive when it comes to exhibiting opportunities. I had a painting in the London Art Fair recently and have two group shows coming up in April/May, both are the debut exhibitions for new project spaces in South London; Collectible at Zeitgeist Project Space in New Cross and Past and Present at Occupy my Time in Deptford. I’m also looking forward to making my first sculpture which will be on display at WW Gallery’s Patio Projects in July, which is part of a public art commission series.

Do you have any ‘studio rituals’? As in, do you listen to certain types of music while working? What helps to get you in the mood for working?

I prefer to get into the studio early and ease into the day by looking at what I’ve been working on, I also need to get in early as I know I can procrastinate with my ritual of catching up on the news so I try to build that into my day. I usually have music playing while working but don’t feel that I need a particular sound to get me in the mood for work, if I’m in the mood I’ll get stuff done, the music just keeps me going.

What is your favorite a) taste, b) sound, c) sight, d) smell, and e) tactile sensation?

A hard question to answer.. a/ taste is best when when unexpected flavours work together but I like spicy things b/ the sound of the sea, seagulls & a gentle wind blowing c/ an uninterrupted landscape of rolling hills and openness d/ burning coals (or the non romantic answer – hot tarmac & petrol) e/ cold soft powdery snow.

Do you have goals that you are trying to reach as an artist, what is your ‘drive’? What would you like to accomplish in your ‘profession’?

I push myself to be better, to enjoy the journey and grow with each opportunity. I am very driven and like most artists I never really switch off, but at that level of involvement with your own practice and the surround artworld you have to love it to keep the level of energy up.

When have you started using the internet and what role does this form of communication play for you, personally, for your art, and for your business?

I suppose I am part of first home computer generation (a child of the 80s) . I was an early starter with websites and actually brought my domain name in my mid teens while at school to show my developing art activities. I now rely on the web to communicate what i’m up to and have found Twitter to be a great tool for networking, I also blog regularly and use Mail Chimp for exhibition mailing list. I find using a mix of social media and websites keeps me connected and up to date with goings on and helps get my work to new audiences (such as being asked to take part in online interviews!).

What do you obsess over?

Career, life/work balance, quality of work produced etc. Its all to easy for an artist to get obsessed by everything but generally I try to keep a balanced head and get on with it.

Do you have prefered working hours? Do you pay attention to the time of the day or maybe specific lighting?

I recently did a year long residency at the Florence Trust (a charitable artist studio program in a Grade 1 listed church in North London), while there I worked full days up to 7 days a week. An amazing experience but not possible for a sustained existence living in an expensive city. I’m a freelance art technician so now have a mix of odd days off in the week, evenings and weekends. I prefer an early start and have full days but realise I have to make do whenever I have the opportunity.

Do you do commissioned works?

I’ve done a few bits for friends and family but even those I found stressful and incongruous with my usual way of working.

Any tips for emerging artists?

A visiting tutor said to me on my foundation that the only reason why he didn’t get further with his art is he didn’t have the energy for it. At the time I was worried I didn’t have the drive and determination to make a go of it but I knew I enjoyed making work. Over time I saw people around me get opportunities and have some form of success, as a young artist a group of peers is an invaluable thing, a great motivator and education in the workings of the system. Don’t expect too much too soon but love what you do and observe others. Don’t wait for opportunities but create them – organise shows, studio groups, meet people and engage.

Your contacts

www.andywicks.co.uk
www.twitter.com/andywickspaints

New Paintings – July 2011

Posted in News, Paintings, Website / Blog update by Andy Wicks on 23 July, 2011

Here are a couple of new paintings completed near the end of my time at the Florence Trust. These both featured in the end of Residency summer show which finished on Monday (18th July). A few more new pieces can be found on my website along with these, click here to view them. I’ll be writing about the exhibition and thoughts on my time at The Florence Trust soon.

Andy Wicks, Katia, 122 x 100cm, Oil on canvas, 2011

Andy Wicks, Maria, 2 canvases at 89.5 x 56 cm, Oil on polyester, 2011

FT Open Studio Images

Posted in Florence Trust by Andy Wicks on 5 February, 2011

(l-r) Annelore Schneider, Ehryn Torrell, Maya Ramsay

(l-r) Adam Watts, Freya Pocklington, Catrin Morgan

(l-r) Anna M.R. Freeman, Alan Magee

(l-r) Andy Wicks, Justin Eagle

Florence Trust Open Studio 21 – 23rd Jan

Posted in Florence Trust by Andy Wicks on 18 January, 2011

A busy week for Florence Trust artists past and present, but this is the big one for us current resident artists. The annual open studio, the halfway point of the residency and an opportunity to throw the big old church doors open to the public to come and see what this years crop have been up to.

I’ll be there across the weekend to discuss my work with anyone that wants to chat, details below..

Florence Trust Sign in the snow

Interior of studios - Anna M.R Freeman work in foreground

New paintings

Posted in Paintings by Andy Wicks on 13 January, 2011

I’ve recently had my new works photographed and have uploaded them to my website as an example of what i’ve been up to over the last few months. It was great to work with a photographer with all the equipment and a proper studio and the results are far superior to anything I’ve ever been able to do myself. For your chance to see them in the flesh make sure you come along to the Florence Trust Open Studio 21 – 23rd January.

More images available on www.andywicks.co.uk

Nicole – 2010 – Oil on Polyester – 25 x 25 cm

Tomas – 2010 – Oil on gesso panel – 25 x 20 cm

Fade Away, Transition Gallery 3rd – 24th December

Posted in Exhibitions by Andy Wicks on 27 November, 2010

I have a painting in Fade Away opening Thursday 2nd December at Transition Gallery, lots of good painters on show. Take a look if your in the area this December.

“… there is a tremendous interest today in what the art historian Dario Gamboni has called ’potential images’, that is, ‘those established—in the realm of the virtual—by the artist but dependent on the beholder for their realization, and their property is to make the beholder aware—either painfully or enjoyably—of the active, subjective, nature of seeing.’” Barry Schwabsky, An Art of Transition.

Phil Allen

fade away is the first in an ongoing series of exhibitions at Transition with guest curators focusing on the diversity of contemporary painting and exploring the ways in which artists are engaged with it.

fade away, which is curated by Alli Sharma, with an accompanying text by Barry Schwabsky, features paintings that oscillate between representation and abstraction. With widely diverse references and subject matter, they all share a strong material presence. Some of the artists work directly from the perceptible world; others use the representational as a point of departure into the abstract, or conversely, explore the abstract, which reveals itself as subject.  Whatever the creative enquiry, they make you think about paint and the act of painting. The dialogue between surface and illusion, representation and abstraction performs a paradoxical balancing act where surfaces are brushed, scored, erased, layered, revealed, dripped and collapsed. Compositions teeter on the verge of illegibility where images emerge and fade away.

Henny Acloque, Phillip Allen, Tim Bailey, Nathan Barlex, Mike Bartlett, Alice Browne,Lindsey Bull, Nick Carrick, Michelle Charles, Clem Crosby, Theo Cuff, Kaye Donachie,Sarah Douglas, Sarah Dwyer, Andrew Graves, Paul Housley, Thomas Hylander,Hannah Knox, Laura Lancaster, Robert Lang, Sarah Lederman, Eleanor Moreton,Mali Morris, Alex Gene Morrison, Nadia Mulder, Jill Mulleady, Mahali O’Hare, Scott O’Rourke, Joanna Pawlowska, Joanna Phelps, Benjamin Senior, Shaan Syed, Zack Thorne, Gavin Toye, Helen Turner, Claire Undy, David Webb, Robert Welch, Andy Wicks, Jo Wilmot.

Transition Gallery                                                                                                              Unit 25a (second floor) Regent Studios
8 Andrews Road, London E8 4QN

3-24 December 2010, Thurs-Sun, 12-6pm                                                           Private View: Thurs, 2 Dec, 6-9pm

Superunknown Press Release

Posted in Exhibitions by Andy Wicks on 18 September, 2010

SUPERUNKNOWN

Michael Ashcroft | Matthew Atkinson | Gordon Cheung | Sayshun Jay | Graham McNamara | David Northedge | Ed Payne | James Roper | Rob Sherwood | David Small | Andy Wicks | Rosalie Wiesner

Edel Assanti is proud to present Superunknown, an exhibition curated by Andy Wicks and David Northedge.

Literature and Hollywood have long been creating dark and empty visions of near future societies in decline.  In the present day, materials addressing this subject matter have once again found their way onto reading lists and cinema screens, forming a focal point for contemporary popular culture.

Projections of our universal future are often delivered in cautionary tones and serve as warning of how to avoid the total decimation of society. Notional futures of grim decaying interiors and bleak grey landscapes populated by savage inhabitants are the cultural benchmark for a morbid moribund world limping towards apocalypse.

Superunknown is a group show of twelve artists who produce work that addresses a future full of dreams, illusions and fantasies, celebrating the neglected virtues of the glossy, lurid and bizarre. The combined works on show articulate a hallucinatory collective vision of a future in which illicit vices serve as the connective tissues for a population wheeling recklessly onwards with a stoic apathy toward redemption and self-preservation.

This group show is formed predominately of painters whose work share a common aesthetic of semi abstraction and contemporary landscape. The exhibition also features photography, video, sculpture and installation based works.

http://edelassanti.com/exhibitiondetails.php?ID=90

Rosalie Wiesner 'Room'

James Roper 'W=mg'